what-is-dreamed-in-mind

anneboleyns:

frozen was so fucking overrated i am so sick of seeing it on my dash it was not revolutionary it was not amazing i wouldn’t even call it “good” it was okay it was mediocre it did not live up the the disney name and it was disappointing stop praising shitty films thank

The long text on Stitch’s adoption certificate actually has nothing to do with information about the actual adoption. It is actually a letter of thanks from the directors (Chris Sanders and Dean DeBlois) and producer (Clark Spencer) thanking the entire team for their work on the project.

lettherebedoodles:

Disney Princesses… ish.

(( Continuation of my Disney Prince Series, but this time with the “ladies” XD.  As for names:

Row I: Charm, Joan, Philippa.

Row II: Aliah, Adalyn, Erica.

Row III: Harmonia, Phoibe, Navya.))

elfgrove:

sporadic-tiger:

veteranfangirl:

Conceal, don’t feel. Don’t let them know.

"[With Elsa, it] definitely was intentional to show anxiety and depression." - JENNIFER LEE (x)

THIS IS ONE OF THE REASONS THIS MOVIE IS SO IMPORTANT. 

Like yes, I agree with the major criticisms going around tumblr re: racism and heteronormativity and not enough major female characters YES, they’re all valid points.  I just don’t understand the bloodlust towards Frozen more than, say, Tangled.  These issues aren’t unique to this movie; they’re widespread societal problems and that leaks into our media.  It can still be a good/enjoyable movie.  I see you SJWers enjoying Aladdin at the same time and that shit’s racist as hell.  Just because something has problematic elements doesn’t make it bad.

BUT THIS CHARACTER IS SO FUCKING IMPORTANT.  Because little girls are obsessed with her, they’re latching on to her.  Little girls love Elsa.  And she’s a Disney Princess with major neuroses.  (I know this is Anna’s story but Elsa’s more popular.)  And it shows a main female character with major anxiety and depression issues, and it shows her as a powerful, strong, loving person around those issues, and it shows her as an incredibly positive character. 

A lot of people are saying that the story would’ve been better if Elsa’d been the antagonist, and she was originally intended to be until that changed in development.  And you know what, it’s for the best because she’s a protagonist with mental issues.  It’s easy and common to give those to a villain.  Villains are twisted and they hurt people because they’re not Good People.  Disney Princesses might not be perfect but they’re damn close to it and their faults are charming and cute and not crippling.  Elsa’s issues and her failure to deal with them are crippling.

So many teens and adults have identified with her issues, and seeing them portrayed in a positive and beloved character is so fucking important, because children see that not just scary weirdos have mental issues.  Elsa hurts people because of her issues.  She doesn’t mean to but she hurts her parents and sister and kingdom and strangers, emotionally and physically.  And she’s a Good Guy.  Not only is she a Good Guy, she’s a Disney Princess.  They’re not supposed to hurt people — except oh maybe hurt feelings because they were following their dreams or something saccharine like that.

And she makes a series of bad choices, selfish choices, because she can’t deal with her issues.  Just like real people.  She’s not a bad person because she makes bad choices stemming from her neuroses.  Little kids see someone who’s awesome! with anxiety and depression and they see that she’s more than just her issues, and she’s deserving of love

This needs to be reblogged by everyone in existence. 

As Xaynie and I have discussed over the past weekend, Elsa’s powers and story make for a strong symbolic story about mental illness. Including her family’s reaction to it. The parents that don’t understand and (although with the best of intentions) make poor choices in handing it. They think the best solution is to hide her and segregate her from the world. Insist she can just control it, clamp it down. The accidental neglect of the other daughter while trying to hide and not discuss rather than address/accept the difficulties and form healthy solutions for dealing with it on a day to day basis and develop coping mechanisms.

As a child, before the accident with Anna, Elsa’s ability was seen as cute and fun (like a child with delusions or schizophrenia might be initially seen as a harmless matter of telling wild stories and playing make believe) but as she grows older or as it causes a real difficulty in the family it suddenly becomes something shameful.

The first meeting with the trolls, they ask if she was “born with it” or if it was “a curse” like asking a person with a mental illness if it was caused by traumatic event or if they were always that way as if one form is acceptable and fixable while the other is not.

Even when Anna first locates Elsa on the mountaintop she insists Elsa can just control it, just stop it, just fix it. The real resolution of the story isn’t until when both sisters realize Elsa can be accepted as a whole person the way she is, and that love and acceptance is the first step to working with the things she was born with instead of trying to cover them up or deny them.

We’re not sayin’ you can change him,
‘Cause people don’t really change.
We’re only saying that love’s a force
That’s powerful and strange.
People make bad choices if they’re mad,
Or scared, or stressed
Throw a little love their way
And you’ll bring out their best
True love brings out their best!

runesby:

y’know for all the racket tumblr makes about having more female leads in films i sure see a lot of genderbent frozen fanart